CUCV Technical Info

Here is information I have collected while working on my m1009, but this information can be used for m1008,m1028, m1028A, and any of the cucv series.

The CUCV (Commercial Utility Cargo Vehicle) was manufactured by General Motors for the U.S. government from 1984-1986. They were built from the heaviest duty parts of GM’s light commercial truck division.  The M1009 is a stripped down blazer that has been modified to reach a 3/4 ton load rating while all other CUCV series trucks are rated at 1 1/4 ton.

Known Problems:

Government Issued Manuals Regarding the CUCV:

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  1. TM 9-2320-289-10 — Operators Manual
  2. TM 9-2320-289-20 — CUCV Maintenance Manual
  3. TM 9-2320-289-34 — Intermediate Maintenance Manual
  4. TM 9-2815-237-34 — 6.2L Engine Maintenance
  5. TM 9-2320-289-20P — Parts Manual
  6. TM 9-2320-289-34P — Intermediate Parts Manual
  7. TB 11-5820-890-20-77 — Radio Install
  8. LO 9-2320-289-12 — Lube Order
  9. TB 43-0147 — Paint Specs

Miscellaneous Information:

  • Dot 5 silicone brake fluid (Level should be 1/4″ below top)
  • Power Steering fluid can either be dextron III transmission fluid or standard power steering fluid (Military used transmission fluid do not mix)

Batteries and Alternators

  • Group 31 or 6TLs (Original)
  • Any 800+ CCA batteries would work
  • Dual 100Amp Alternators wired in series for 24V
  • Passenger side alt MUST BE ISOLATED GROUND!

Engine:

  • 6.2L Naturally Aspirated J Code Detroit Diesel V8 (Slightly higher output than early civilian C code engines)
    • Injector Pump
      • Stanadyne Roosa Master DB2 (Click for detailed information)
      • The estimated life is 100,000 miles. However, in a 25 year old vehicle, the seals are worn out.
      • If you are leaking fuel from the bell-housing cover, it is likely drain off from the IP through a hole in the rear of the engine compartment
      • The first seals to wear out are normally the throttle-shaft seals which are inexpensive but a time consuming job to replace in which the intake must be removed. Also the wearing of these seals normally corresponds with the wearing of the pump itself and it may be better to rebuild or replace the pump if it is original. Rebuilt pumps are usually in the $3-500 range plus a core charge if you don’t provide them with your old one. Getting your IP rebuilt is probably the best thing you can do for your vehicle.
    • Normal Coolant Operating Temperature: 180*F – 230*F
    • Normal Oil Operating Temperature: 180*F – 260*F
    • Oil Pressure: 40 – 50 psi (running), 10 psi (idle)
    • Governor Settings (Governed Speed)
      • Full Load: 3600 rpm
      • No Load: 4000 rpm
      • Idle Speed: 625 – 675 rpm
    • Compression Ratio: 21.5:1
    • Dry Weight: 650 lbs
  • Maintenance:
    • Fuel Filter (Fuel filter base is a common leak point)
      • NAPA# FIL3136
      • FRAM # P3940A
    • Oil
      • 8 Quart Capacity (including filter)
      • Filter is FRAM# PH5, NAPA# FIL1092, ACDELCO# PF1218CL, K&N# HP-3002
    • Thermostat
      • NAPA 381-190
      • Autozone 42995
      • Orielly 42995
    • Glow Plugs
    • Belts (Not for M1010)
      • Driver side alt Gates# 7575/Dayco# 15580
      • Passenger side alt Gates# 7483/Dayco# 15490
      • Power Steering Gates# 7448/Dayco# 15455
    • Air Filter
      • Any standard air filter designated for use in a diesel K5/K30 works

Transmission:

  • Turbo-Hydramatic 400 (Th400)
    • CUCVs should have a factory deep sump pan and a bolt on cast aluminum torque converter cover
    • Dextron III Oil
      • 4 Quart capacity
      • Replace filter ever 2 years or 24,000 miles
        • NAPA#  ATP14558,
        • FRAM#  FT1020A (w/gasket)
    • If running oversize tires or towing an external cooler is HIGHLY recommended in addition to the water to oil cooler in the radiator

Transfer Case:

  •  NP208 aluminum chain driven transfer case (M1009/M1008/M1028/M1010)
  •  NP205 cast iron gear driven transfer case with PTO abilities (M1031)
  • Dextron III fluid
    • 5 quart capacity
    • Level should be 1/4″ below filler plug

Axles:

  • M1009
    • 10 bolt axles front and rear with 3.08 gears and a Gov-Loc in the rear (Not Dana 60 front and 14 bolt rear like some believe)
  • All other CUCV’s
    • Dana 60 front
      • Front Capacity 4.5 Quarts
    • 14 Bolt FF rear with Detroit locker and 4.56 gears (some have a true-track locker in the front as well, but it is rare)
      • Rear Capacity 5.4 Quarts
      • M1028 needs GM additive

Lights/Blackout Lights

  • The right toggle switch moves power to the service lights, horn, dash, etc (up position) or to the blackout lights (down position). Pull it out and flip it up or down.
  • The left switch turns on the blackout drive light. Flip it up or down; it will return to center position.
  • If your lights suddenly don’t work, check the right toggle switch.

Tachometer:

There are multiple options to get a tach installed in a CUCV the simplest being a digital tiny tach (http://www.tinytach.com/tinytach/diesel.php) the fuel injection lines on the CUCV are 1/4″ OD. The CUCV alternators also have a tach output on the alternators so that can be used for certain tachometers as well.

CUCV Fuse Box:

Fuse Panel

Some information on this page from http://www.steelsoldiers.com

103 Responses to “CUCV Technical Info”

  1. Steve says:

    Hey fellow M1000 series owners.
    I have a 86 M1009 recently the window washer stopped working. I checked all hose making sure they weren’t clogged, took off reservoir & cleaned no issues in previous listed, so I purchased a new wiper motor/pump, but still not working. was wondering if anyone else has run into this issue? Thanks

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